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    The idea for the Volkswagen bus comes from the Dutch Volkswagen importer Ben Pon. When he visited the Volkswagen factory in Wolfsburg on April 23, 1947, he saw a transport truck on a Volkswagen Beetle bottom plate, which was used for internal transport. With this Plattenwagen as a starting point he sketched a van. In 1948 Heinrich Nordhoff decided that Volkswagen would work out the sketch. It soon became apparent that the bottom plate of the Beetle was too weak to carry a fully loaded van. Instead came a ladder chassis with a self-supporting body. The result was tested in the wind tunnel of the Technical University of Braunschweig. When the air resistance turned out to be rather high, the university proposed a rounded shape. This made the air resistance lower than that of the Beetle. The serial production of the new model began on March 8, 1950.

    In the series Nederland retro we have several Dutch pictures on beautiful Delft blue plates. A very nice gift with nostalgic images that are still very contemporary. 25cm

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a

The idea for the Volkswagen bus comes from the Dutch Volkswagen importer Ben Pon. When he visited the Volkswagen factory in Wolfsburg on April 23, 1947, he saw a transport truck on a Volkswagen Beetle bottom plate, which was used for internal transport. With this Plattenwagen as a starting point he sketched a van. In 1948 Heinrich Nordhoff decided that Volkswagen would work out the sketch. It soon became apparent that the bottom plate of the Beetle was too weak to carry a fully loaded van. Instead came a ladder chassis with a self-supporting body. The result was tested in the wind tunnel of the Technical University of Braunschweig. When the air resistance turned out to be rather high, the university proposed a rounded shape. This made the air resistance lower than that of the Beetle. The serial production of the new model began on March 8, 1950.

In the series Nederland retro we have several Dutch pictures on beautiful Delft blue plates. A very nice gift with nostalgic images that are still very contemporary. 25cm

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a

Volkswagen bus plate Delft blue

A very nice gift with nostalgic images that are still very contemporary. 25cm Packed in a nice box and with an iron to hang up.
Volkswagen bus plate Delft blue
Volkswagen bus plate Delft blue €26,95
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    The idea for the Volkswagen bus comes from the Dutch Volkswagen importer Ben Pon. When he visited the Volkswagen factory in Wolfsburg on April 23, 1947, he saw a transport truck on a Volkswagen Beetle bottom plate, which was used for internal transport. With this Plattenwagen as a starting point he sketched a van. In 1948 Heinrich Nordhoff decided that Volkswagen would work out the sketch. It soon became apparent that the bottom plate of the Beetle was too weak to carry a fully loaded van. Instead came a ladder chassis with a self-supporting body. The result was tested in the wind tunnel of the Technical University of Braunschweig. When the air resistance turned out to be rather high, the university proposed a rounded shape. This made the air resistance lower than that of the Beetle. The serial production of the new model began on March 8, 1950.

    In the series Nederland retro we have several Dutch pictures on beautiful Delft blue plates. A very nice gift with nostalgic images that are still very contemporary. 25cm

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a

The idea for the Volkswagen bus comes from the Dutch Volkswagen importer Ben Pon. When he visited the Volkswagen factory in Wolfsburg on April 23, 1947, he saw a transport truck on a Volkswagen Beetle bottom plate, which was used for internal transport. With this Plattenwagen as a starting point he sketched a van. In 1948 Heinrich Nordhoff decided that Volkswagen would work out the sketch. It soon became apparent that the bottom plate of the Beetle was too weak to carry a fully loaded van. Instead came a ladder chassis with a self-supporting body. The result was tested in the wind tunnel of the Technical University of Braunschweig. When the air resistance turned out to be rather high, the university proposed a rounded shape. This made the air resistance lower than that of the Beetle. The serial production of the new model began on March 8, 1950.

In the series Nederland retro we have several Dutch pictures on beautiful Delft blue plates. A very nice gift with nostalgic images that are still very contemporary. 25cm

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a